Estimation of Heavy Metals, Essential Trace Elements and Anti-Nutritional Factors in Leaves and Stems from Moringa oleifera
International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology
Volume 4, Issue 2, June 2019, Pages: 51-55
Received: May 25, 2019; Accepted: Jun. 27, 2019; Published: Jul. 24, 2019
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Authors
Niaz Mahmud, Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Monirul Islam, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; Rural Development Academy (RDA), Bogra, Bangladesh
Md. Shovon Al-Fuad, Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Samiron Sana, Pharmacy Discipline, Khulna University, Khulna, Bangladesh
Md. Jannatul Ferdaus, Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Suzon Ahmed, Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Shahriar Islam Satya, Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Md. Abdullah Al Mamun, Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Nazmus Sakib, Department of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Md. Shofiqul Islam, Department of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
Shuvonkar Kangsha Bonik, Department of Nutrition and Food Technology, Jashore University of Science and Technology, Jashore, Bangladesh
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Abstract
This study was conducted to estimate the concentrations of 8 trace elements including (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni, Ar, Cr, and Pb) and 4 anti-nutritional factors including (saponins, oxalates, phytate, and cyanogenic glycosides) in leaves and stems from Moringa oleifera. The concentrations in samples analyzed were found to be in the range of 0.88-1.88 mg/kg for Mn, 11.95-25.25 mg/kg for Fe, 0.35-1.22 mg/kg for Cu, 6.92-17.96 mg/kg for Zn, 0.03-0.07 mg/kg for Ni, 0.955-1.45 mg/kg for Cr and 0.564-0.85 mg/kg for Pb. However, Arsenic was not detected in all the samples analyzed. As for the anti-nutritional factors, the concentrations in samples analyzed were found to be in the range of 111.35-123.42 mg/kg for saponins, 69.5-509.4 mg/kg for oxalates, and 0.38-0.156 mg/kg for phytate and 316.95-325.27 mg/kg for cyanogenic glycosides. The values of all these elements were found significantly below the recommended maximum tolerable guidelines level proposed by WHO/FAO except for lead (Pb), Pb was found slightly higher than the recommended limit as described. Our findings of this study reveal that most of the trace elements found in M. oleifera are below the recommended maximum tolerable limits; therefore it is safe for both human and animal consumption as well.
Keywords
Moringa oleifera, Heavy Metals, Trace Elements and Anti-nutritional Factors
To cite this article
Niaz Mahmud, Monirul Islam, Md. Shovon Al-Fuad, Samiron Sana, Md. Jannatul Ferdaus, Suzon Ahmed, Shahriar Islam Satya, Md. Abdullah Al Mamun, Nazmus Sakib, Md. Shofiqul Islam, Shuvonkar Kangsha Bonik, Estimation of Heavy Metals, Essential Trace Elements and Anti-Nutritional Factors in Leaves and Stems from Moringa oleifera, International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2019, pp. 51-55. doi: 10.11648/j.ijfsb.20190402.14
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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