Level of Knowledge About Neonatal Danger Signs and Associated Factors Among Mothers Who Delivered at Home in Fogera District, South West, Ethiopia
Biomedical Statistics and Informatics
Volume 3, Issue 4, December 2018, Pages: 53-60
Received: Jan. 2, 2019; Accepted: Jan. 25, 2019; Published: Mar. 13, 2019
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Authors
Desalegn Tesfa Asnakew, Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debra Tabor, Ethiopia
Melaku Tadege Engidaw, Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debra Tabor, Ethiopia
Alemayehu Digssie Gebremariam, Public Health Department, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debra Tabor, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Introduction: Due to little recognition of families about neonatal danger sign in many developing countries like Ethiopia, almost all of the neonates are not taken to health institutions early when they are sick and the majority of the newborn death occurred at their home. Therefore mother's health-seeking behavior in neonatal care extremely relies on their knowledge of neonatal danger signs: however, little is known about the mother’s knowledge and associated factors on neonatal ganger signs in Ethiopia. So, the main aim of this study was to assess the level of mother's knowledge about neonatal danger signs and its associated factors. Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 2018 from 845 mothers who delivered in the last six months and a multi-stage sampling was applied. Data were collected by nurses and midwives, and cleaned by EPI INFO software version 7. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 21. Bivariable and multivariable logistic analyses were deployed to identify the associations. Results: In this study 542 (64.1%) with 95% CI (60.8-67.5) of mothers had good knowledge about newborn danger sign. Spousal involvement during ANC AOR= 1.77; 95% CI (1.28-2.46), assisted with traditional birth attendant AOR=1.39; 95% CI (1.00-1.93), had mass-media AOR= 1.53 95% CI (1.11-2.10), women who went to postnatal care /visited by health extension workers after delivery AOR= 1.35; 95% CI (1.00-1.81) were the independent predictors of mother's good knowledge of neonatal danger signs. Conclusions: In this study, greater than one-third of the respondents had no enough knowledge of WHO recognition newly born danger signs. Spousal involvement during ANC, delivery attendants, went for PNC/ visited by HEWS after delivery and availability of mass media were variables which are significantly associated with knowledge of good newborn danger signs. Routine counseling to pregnant mothers about the importance of PNC, ANC, and spousal involvement during PNC and ANC is essential. Refresher training to Health extension workers and counseling of traditional birth attendants to link pregnant mothers to Health institutions must be a great issue.
Keywords
Neonatal Danger Signs, Newborn, Associated Factors
To cite this article
Desalegn Tesfa Asnakew, Melaku Tadege Engidaw, Alemayehu Digssie Gebremariam, Level of Knowledge About Neonatal Danger Signs and Associated Factors Among Mothers Who Delivered at Home in Fogera District, South West, Ethiopia, Biomedical Statistics and Informatics. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2018, pp. 53-60. doi: 10.11648/j.bsi.20180304.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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